Orwell Award Announcement SusanOhanian.Org Home


The Eggplant

 

in the collection  

Education Dept. Proposes Rule on '2 Percent' Flexibility for Testing Students With Disabilities

Secretary Spellings had announced the 2 percent flexibility measure last spring, and states were given an opportunity to use interim measures to adjust their test scores for the 2004-05 school year. The result, for some states, is that more schools made adequate yearly progress, or AYP--a key standard of performance under the 4-year-old law--because their passing rates for the students-with-disabilities subgroup improved. The Education Department plans to extend the interim policy for the 2005-06 school year to allow public comment on the proposed regulation, which was scheduled to be published in the Federal Register on Dec. 15. It would take at least several months for the proposed rule to become final.

"At its heart, this policy is all about improving the way we educate and assess children with disabilities. It's a smarter, more sophisticated way of serving their needs," Ms. Spellings told the group of local and state education officials gathered at Guilford Elementary School, which has 412 students, 9 percent of whom have disabilities.

An earlier Education Department flexibility policy, which is intended for 1 percent of all students, remains in place. It is intended to provide flexibility to schools for students who have severe cognitive disabilities. The new proposed rule is for students who can achieve at higher levels than the students in that 1 percent group, which accounts for about 10 percent of students with disabilities.

— Christina A. Samuels
Education Week (web only)


INDEX OF THE EGGPLANT


FAIR USE NOTICE
This site contains copyrighted material the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We are making such material available in our efforts to advance understanding of education issues vital to a democracy. We believe this constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. For more information click here. If you wish to use copyrighted material from this site for purposes of your own that go beyond 'fair use', you must obtain permission from the copyright owner.